Recycling Les Braves’ waste into jewelry puts underprivileged women to work

To date, 34 women have been hired at a shelter living in Detroit by Rebel Nell to process material that would otherwise be thrown into jewelry. Twenty-two of these women have entered the mainstream workforce, said Amy Peterson, CEO and co-founder of the organization.

Legend

Azzie Caldwell and other Rebel Nell employees learn the art of jewelry making. Fans have a piece of history. Items that would otherwise be thrown away are put to good use. And disadvantaged women are encouraged and empowered, says CEO Amy Peterson. Courtesy of Rebel Nell

Credit: Photos provided by Rebel Nell

Azzie Caldwell and other Rebel Nell employees learn the art of jewelry making.  Fans have a piece of history.  Items that would otherwise be thrown away are put to good use.  And disadvantaged women are encouraged and empowered, says CEO Amy Peterson.  Courtesy of Rebel Nell
Legend

Azzie Caldwell and other Rebel Nell employees learn the art of jewelry making. Fans have a piece of history. Items that would otherwise be thrown away are put to good use. And disadvantaged women are encouraged and empowered, says CEO Amy Peterson. Courtesy of Rebel Nell

Credit: Photos provided by Rebel Nell

Credit: Photos provided by Rebel Nell

This year, Rebel Nell began to establish itself in Georgia. Not only does the company sell jewelry made from materials salvaged from the Braves dugout canoe in Truist Park, but it has also launched a new line made from recyclable graffiti salvaged from the streets of Atlanta. Each piece of jewelry costs on average around $ 60.

“We are setting the stage in 2021 with the hope of opening a similar operation in Atlanta in a year or two, if the pandemic permits,” Peterson said.

Legend

Amy Peterson worked as a lawyer for the Detroit Tigers. But seeing unlucky people made him rethink the trip of his life. She co-founded Rebel Nell eight years ago and hired 34 women living in a shelter to create one-of-a-kind wearable art. She also helps women in other ways to get up. Courtesy of Rebel Nell

Credit: Rebel [email protected]

Amy Peterson worked as a lawyer for the Detroit Tigers.  But seeing unlucky people made him rethink the trip of his life.  She co-founded Rebel Nell eight years ago and hired 34 women living in a shelter to create one-of-a-kind wearable art.  She also helps women in other ways to get up.  Courtesy of Rebel Nell
Legend

Amy Peterson worked as a lawyer for the Detroit Tigers. But seeing unlucky people made him rethink the trip of his life. She co-founded Rebel Nell eight years ago and hired 34 women living in a shelter to create one-of-a-kind wearable art. She also helps women in other ways to get up. Courtesy of Rebel Nell

Credit: Rebel [email protected]

Credit: Rebel [email protected]

She has long had a passion for baseball. At 14, she decided she wanted to be the first female GM of a major league baseball team, which happened to Kim Ng last year with the Miami Marlins.

After college, law school, and business school, Peterson landed an internship with the Detroit Tigers which she ultimately turned into a team lawyer position. It was during her 11 years with the Tigers that she began to rethink her career.

“I lived right next to a shelter that caters to women and families,” said Peterson. “I got to know the residents when I walked my dog ​​or came home from work. I was moved by their stories – so many of them left difficult situations in search of a better opportunity for themselves and their families. “

From this experience was born Rebel Nell.

“It mixed my love of two worlds,” she said.

The name of her company is a tip of the hat to the late First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, a pioneer in women’s empowerment and social justice known as “Little Nell”.

Peterson, whose social enterprise sells jewelry for the Detroit Tigers, said Rebel Nell allows fans of the teams to have a piece of history and put items to good use that would otherwise be thrown away.

Legend

Social enterprise Rebel Nell hopes to start designing unique handmade jewelry in Atlanta soon, giving some of the city’s homeless a helping hand. Rebel Nell employed 34 women in jewelry making in eight years. Courtesy of Rebel Nell

Credit: Photos courtesy of Rebel Nell, CEO Amy Peterson

Social enterprise Rebel Nell hopes to start designing unique handmade jewelry in Atlanta soon, giving some of the city's homeless a helping hand.  Rebel Nell employed 34 women in jewelry making in eight years.  Courtesy of Rebel Nell
Legend

Social enterprise Rebel Nell hopes to start designing unique handmade jewelry in Atlanta soon, giving some of the city’s homeless a helping hand. Rebel Nell employed 34 women in jewelry making in eight years. Courtesy of Rebel Nell

Credit: Photos courtesy of Rebel Nell, CEO Amy Peterson

Credit: Photos courtesy of Rebel Nell, CEO Amy Peterson

“But the big picture is what it does for the women we employ and how it provides them with opportunities for empowerment and upliftment,” she said.

During the first 12 months that women are on Rebel Nell’s payroll, staff help them find permanent housing, learn to create and live on a budget, and overcome past barriers to success, such as than their driving record, access to child care and credit. score, said Peterson.

Ethel Rucker, 34, a resident of Detroit, considers herself lucky to work for Rebel Nell.

She joined the association in November 2020 when she was unemployed and struggled to find stable work to support herself and her four children, one of whom had special needs.

“Working here has been amazing,” said Rucker. “My life is back on track and is better than ever because of Rebel Nell.”

Atlanta Braves spokesperson Sarit Babboni heard about Rebel Nell through the Detroit Tigers Foundation.

“We saw the opportunity to partner with a social enterprise doing incredible work for women – knowing that Braves fans would love the unique pieces in the collection,” Babboni said. “Investing in programs that support women and developing creative ways to support women’s economic security and independence is a need everywhere. “

Legend

These bottle caps were made by homeless women in Detroit from materials found in the Atlanta Braves’ dugout canoe in Truist Park. Rebel Nell, the company that employs these women, hopes to move to Atlanta soon. Photo courtesy of Rebel Nell, CEO Amy Peterson

Credit: Photos courtesy of Amy Peterson, CEO of Rebel Nell

These bottle caps were made by homeless women in Detroit from materials found in the Atlanta Braves' dugout canoe in Truist Park.  Rebel Nell, the company that employs these women, hopes to move to Atlanta soon.  Photo courtesy of Rebel Nell, CEO Amy Peterson
Legend

These bottle caps were made by homeless women in Detroit from materials found in the Atlanta Braves’ dugout canoe in Truist Park. Rebel Nell, the company that employs these women, hopes to move to Atlanta soon. Photo courtesy of Rebel Nell, CEO Amy Peterson

Credit: Photos courtesy of Amy Peterson, CEO of Rebel Nell

Credit: Photos courtesy of Amy Peterson, CEO of Rebel Nell

Moultrie, who heads DeKalb DA’s Diversion and Community Alternatives program, said Rebel Nell helps women overcome personal challenges and transform themselves “the same way they turn discarded objects into desirable art.”

“Having spoken with Amy about her work and her vision, I know she views the women she works with as found gems in our community,” she said.

Read more on: rebelnell.com.